Export Finance

There are a number of U.S. government and international organizations which help to promote exporting through their financing activities and programs.

U.S. Small Business Association International Programs

As SBA’s office for the support of small business international trade development, the Office of International Trade works in cooperation with other federal agencies and public- and private-sector groups to encourage small business exports and to assist small businesses seeking to export. Through 19 U.S. Export Assistance Centers, SBA district offices and a variety of service-provider partners, we direct and coordinate SBA’s ongoing export initiatives in an effort to encourage small businesses going global.

U.S. Export-Import Bank (EXIM)

The Export-Import Bank supports the financing of U.S. goods and services, turning export opportunities into real transactions, maintaining and creating more U.S. jobs. We assume credit and country risks the private sector is unable or unwilling to accept.

Overseas Private Investment Corporation

The Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) was established as a development agency of the U.S. government in 1971. OPIC helps U.S. businesses invest overseas, fosters economic development in new and emerging markets, complements the private sector in managing the risks associated with foreign direct investment, and supports U.S. foreign policy. By expanding economic development in host countries, OPIC-supported projects can encourage political stability, free market reforms and U.S. best practices. OPIC projects also support American jobs and exports-over 280,000 new U.S. jobs and $65 billion in exports since 1971. Because OPIC charges market-based fees for its products, it operates on a self-sustaining basis at no net cost to taxpayers.

USDOC Office of Finance – Trade Finance Guide

Trade Finance Guide: A Quick Reference for U.S. Exporters is designed to help U.S. companies, especially small and medium-sized enterprises, learn the basic fundamentals of trade finance so that they can turn their export opportunities into actual sales and achieve the ultimate goal of getting paid–especially on time–for those sales. Concise, two-page chapters offer the basics of numerous financing techniques, from open accounts, to forfaiting to government assisted foreign buyer financing.